The Online Genealogist

John Brugliera

Archive for the tag “maps”

Old maps RULE!!!!

NH Map Long before delving into family history research, I was a cartography junkie.  I could read a map like a “See Dick Run” book at a very early age.  I’d often go pretend-driving along various roads and highways, usually with no destination in mind.  “Go left here, take the next right on US 6…”. Anyway, I was just checking out some late 1800s maps – the ones that list owners, residents, etc.  It never fails that I always find something that gives me a chuckle or makes me scratch my head and go “Wha?????” Like this…

Rocky-RookyIn Wentworth, NH, there’s Rocky Pond and Rooky Brook — which is it??  I’d have to guess Rocky, unless the brook is a green newbie – heh.

Then there are the various names on these maps.  In keeping with the rocky theme, we have this pairing in Sullivan, NH…

Stone Mason

I wonder if these neighbors had a good laugh on that one!

Here’s another combo in Winchester, NH; sort of weather-related…

Willard Scott

Now THESE two neighbors had no idea at the time!

Speaking of weather, looks like some low morning clouds in East Alstead, NH…

A.M.Fogg

His name, of course, being something like Alexander Melvin Fogg, as these maps mainly used initials for first and middle names.

So, any Irving Benjamin [SURNAME] would show as…

I.B.Ham

“Yes, I.B. Ham from Haverhill, NH!”

But don’t hold your breath…

N.HaleI couldn’t find his brother Xavier Hale anywhere in Westmoreland, NH – har, har, har!

First name Charles, Clifford or Christopher?  Doesn’t matter, as he was in Keene, NH long before any type of lasers…

C.DeeAnd another musical “C” in nearby Chesterfield, NH…

C.Miner

B. Sharpe and D. Flatt can’t be far behind!

And not at Kitty Hawk, but North Haverhill, NH…

WrightBros

Meanwhile, further south in Winchester, NH, some possible cousins?…

Wright Place

Dr. John!  Wright Place, Rong Time!

In about 25 years, this would’ve been an awkward neighborhood.

Ford & Dodge

And a tip of the hat to Mr. Stanley above these two, whose Steamer was around just a few years prior to these two familiar nameplates.

In Bradford, VT, not a Lowe’s, but a…

Lows

And these in East Enfield, NH I found to be quite baffling…

Enfield Summer Residence

To the left, there’s “Hon. J. Jonson Fam”, which I’m assuming to be “family”, but what’s that to the right?  Same thing, but followed by some garbled abbreviations.  Summer residence??

If so, does the family cross the street in the summer to live there?  That would be silly.  But I need to KNOW these things!!!

And a final map page we’ll categorize under “What’s wrong with this picture?”

So.Stoddard

The first question I had was “What is South Stoddard, NH doing in northeast Stoddard?!?”  That is, until I saw the NORTH arrow below the map.  Ahhhhhhhhhhh.

And if you’re having trouble finding your way through your family history, hire ME – The Online Genealogist!!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

Nothin’ like a few million FREE IMAGES to spice up your family story!

Flickr - IA

The Internet Archive folks recently posted over 2.5 million IMAGES onto the photo-sharing website, Flickr.  Extracted from thousands of books originally searchable by text ONLY at Internet Archive.  Now the images can be searched on Flickr!

Why is this a big deal for genealogists?  We get perty pictures to go with our family histories!  Even though they are mostly “old” images past copyright, you’ll  surely discover a visual gem or two to accompany your ancestors’ stories.

Whether it be something specific like a photo of a long-gone family homestead or generic such as a period steam liner used to illustrate an immigrant family’s trans-Atlantic journey – it’s probably in there.  Remember, we’re talking over two-and-a-half million images here!

So, if you had MacLarens in Windsor, Ontario around 1900, they may have been “manufacturing” cheese…

MacLaren

Or perhaps some of your family lived near Chicago’s Garfield Park.  Here’s a close-up of that area from 1921.  There are several other neighborhoods available for viewing/downloading!

Garfield

Maybe you’re the 3rd-great-grandchild of Dr. P. Edward Seguin, who set up practice in Royalton, Minnesota.  Do a Flickr search for him now and his photo comes right up!  He’s the one with the facial hair (heh).

Seguin 01

Then you hit a link and the original book is shown in its entirety; you’ll see the image in context and maybe find a few more words to go with your Man of 10,000 Lakes.

Seguin 02

Nice stash there, guy.  Oh, and check out his goateed colleague, George Allen Love, M.D. — Dr. Love!  (And yes, I love stuff “finding me” like this.)  Time to break out some Kiss!…

And while most early records aren’t OCR-friendly, they are definitely considered to be images.  Such as the below Allen County, Indiana Circuit Court Index from 1824.  (Hi ACPL!)  All images are downloadable, with Flickr’s excellent choices ranging from thumbnail to original.  I always grab the original, then re-size that as needed.

Allen 02

You can also download several stock photo-type items without the worry of being busted by the copyright police!  Like this large uppercase “C” for your the background of your Carlson Family homepage.

C

Anyway, you get the idea.  That is to NOT overlook this incredible Flickr/Internet Archive e-collection while gathering all sorts of images for your family story.

Then there’s this one image we will ALL use when we finish our family histories and they’re complete.

Adam & Eve

HA – GOTCHA!!!

Oh, and PhotoShop, etc. can also straighten images to make them even PERTIER!

 

And if YOU think that your ancestry can be traced all the way back to Adam & Eve, do NOT hire me — the Online Genealogist!!

TOG WEB

 

 johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

The Online Genealogist sez “Know Your Geography!”

Burlington-Plattsburgh

I don’t usually call out others on their blog postings, but being the huge map hound that I am and more so given the source, I just had to here.

G-Bank

And my comment…

G-Bank 2

My question is this…  If a great point is made using a poor example, does that bring the credibility of that point down a few notches?

After knowing the geography, is it really such a great point; especially coming from a blogger that represents a subscription website featuring newspapers from all over the country?

G-Bank 3

Given Mr. Kemp’s impressive resume, shouldn’t he have known this and chosen a better example for his sorta-almost-kinda-great point?

Now, if this had been penned by a newbie genealogist or obviously-hired content writer {ahem}, I wouldn’t even be blogging about it.  But we’re barraged with so many tips and the like online, we have to really be selective in what to use…and what to TOSS.

Sorry, Tom – I’m not meaning to put you in front of the virtual firing squad or anything, but your post happens to be a PERFECT example of the point I’m trying to make here.  Which will hopefully be great.  “Any last words?…”

 

And if you don’t know that Burlington, Vermont is in Chittenden County, but Chittenden, Vermont is in Rutland County or that St. Louis and East St. Louis are in different states, you may need to hire ME – The Online Genealogist!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

Genealogy research without these will leave you LOST

 

 

GenInTime

In reviewing GenealogyInTime‘s Top 100 Websites for 2014, one of MY most-used sites for research wasn’t on here – Old Maps Online.

OMO

Old Maps Online is more of a collection of historical map collections; I’m talking AMAZING collections, most notably Cartography Associates’ David Rumsey Map Collection and Boston Public Library’s Norman B. Leventhal Map Center.

If you don’t use maps in your research, why the heck not?  Historical maps often provide excellent clues when tracking your ancestors; especially if they remained in one place for an extended period of time.

Streets, rivers and hills; roads, streams and mountains; any of them could be named after your ancestor.  Williams Drive, Pierson Hill, Carson’s Crossing, Skinner River.  All named for somebody.  Or a family of somebodies if several generations lived in an area.

You could also check out some of those very detailed county atlases from the late 1800s and find exactly where your ancestor lived.  I love aimlessly browsing through these.

David Rumsey

Given the time that these county atlases were published, many can be used as an 1890 Federal Census replacement of sorts.

Maps should be one of your FIRST stops in a research project.  Whether you know the area or not.

I’ve discovered SO MUCH by utilizing geographical genealogy!

 

And if you’re having trouble finding your way in ANY aspect of your genealogical research, I can help to point you in the right direction!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

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