The Online Genealogist

John Brugliera

Archive for the tag “historical”

Genealogical Guffaws & Ha-Ha History

Time once again for The Online Genealogist to dip into his bag of garba- er, TRICKS and bring you the “best” and “funniest” items you will ever “see”!  Gotta love the quotes; no disclaimer required!

For you newbie readers of this garba- er, BLOG, that would be any family history-related tidbit found in print, such as newspapers and city directories.  But mostly, newspapers and city directories.  Most anything that fits into the “Ya just can’t make this up and if you did; why would you want to?” category.

And newspaper marriage combos are my favorites!  I could be so lucky to find most humorous pairings like STRAW-HOUSE, MOORE-RONN or KNOTT-PFUNNIE; so instead, you get this garba- STUFF!  From the Brooklyn Daily Eagle

Bklyn Eagle 18600810a Church-Church

Two Churches married by a Rev. Bell… in a church!

Not living up to his name…

Bklyn Eagle 18600801a Elder

…and an oxymoronic exit from this earth…

Bklyn Eagle 19260127 Lively death

Ah, yes – a Lively death.

On the flip side, here’s a boring couple for ya…

Bklyn Eagle 18601201a Moore-Knapp

They’re a hit a parties!  Zzzzzzz.

Besides the splotchy print, what is wrong with this marriage announcement?

Bklyn Eagle 18610520a Doherty-Rev. Pise

Score 50 points if you answered “Wait a minute!… Who’s gettin’ married here??”

Fortunately, it was corrected the next day.

Bklyn Eagle 18610521a Doherty-O'Donnell

…after a lengthy tongue-lashing from the furious bride, I’m sure!

Well, well, well…

Bklyn Eagle 18620307a Crowell-Cornwell

Many confusing introductions at THAT reception.  Ya think??

Is this a marriage or chess commentary?!?

Bklyn Eagle 18700203a Bishop-Trappall

Of course, BISHOP-KNIGHT would’ve been funnier.  Though maybe not for Miss Owatta Knight.

This is probably more common than you’d think…

Bklyn Eagle 18620528a Walsh-Walters

…marrying the girl that sat behind you in school!

What’s worse than two families flipping out, worrying about the upcoming marriage?

Bklyn Eagle 18600906a McFarland-Ashfield(x2)

…having to go through that hell, times two!!

Jeez, the McFarlands and Ashfields took up so much room that last newlyweds Arnold and Amaret were left with SQUAT!

Not looking for Lois and Clark; but super, man.

Bklyn Eagle 18700429a Kent-Lane

From the 1915 (!) Lebanon, NH city directory, it’s not Sam Carpenter, house-builder, but…

Directory Lebanon 1915 175a

Staying in Lebanon, but this coming from the Granite State Free Press.

GSFP 19420914 01a

We can only hope!

Here’s another “Fire the ad agency!!”-worthy ad in the Norwich Bulletin

Norwich Bulletin 19141113 07a

See comment below barber Pat… above.

It’s May 18, 1861 and this Bangor Daily Whig ad says Uncle Sam is NOT looking for soldiers to sign up for the barely-started Civil War.

Bangor Daily Whig 18610518 02a

“You’ll never see combat!  Only fifes and/or drums!!”  Yeah, riiiiiiiiiiiiight.

And the typesetter is getting a little tipsy at the Omaha Daily Bee

Omaha Bee 19150612 18a Crooked Type

Oh, today’s e-editors have NO idea.

Should you be worried if your newspaper editor may also be QUACKING?  From the Bradford page in an 1858 Vermont atlas…

Dr. Editor Mann

Voodoo doctor?  Super, Mann!

Even so, sounds better than his colleague Dr. Farr; a mechanical dentist.  I can hear the machinery nearing a patient’s mouth now.  Oh, the screams.

And the July 19, 1856 issue of the Boston Transcript shows that it was NOT a good day to be a George Russell in New England.

Boston Transcript 18560719a

And so ends this Ancestry.com-free blog posting!!!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

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The Online Genealogist is thankful for… online genealogy!!

OG 01

When I began my family history research in 1989 and someone told me I’d be The Online Genealogist in 2014, I’d reply with “On WHAT line?  My paternal or maternal??

Boy, have we come a long way in 25 years!  When historians look back on genealogy as a whole, there’s probably NO other quarter-century period where SO much has changed.  I say for the better, but others mainly those stubborn non-technical types wouldn’t be so quick to jump up and down in excitement for online genealogy and what’s in store for the future.

OG 02

So I thought now would be the perfect time to compare family history research, then (1989), now (2014) and in the future.  Remember that old song In The Year 2525?  Well, we won’t go THAT far ahead… How about 2025?  Which, of course, would be all speculation on my part.

OG 03

Then:  The majority of genealogical research is conducted in libraries.

Now:  A large percentage of genealogical research can be conducted via the internet.

Future:  The MAJORITY of genealogical research can be conducted via the internet.

Then:  The research you’re undertaking is heavily dictated by what repositories you can physically visit and when.  You’re at the mercy of the hours they’re open and when you can get there.

Now:  The research you’re undertaking is heavily dictated by the research path you’re following online – 24/7.  A MUCH more natural and efficient way to conduct ANY type of research!.  The “old” method is seriously backwards and counter-intuitive.  Instead of going with the flow, you’re often swimming upstream; researching what you can where you’re at when you can.

Future:  Even more “now” research and less “then”, which is inefficient and “highly illogical”.  Thank you Mr. Spock!

OG 04

Then:  A specific research plan can take weeks – even MONTHS – to complete.

Now:  A specific research plan can take a few hours – even MINUTES – to complete.

Future:  A specific research plan can take minutes – even SECONDS – to complete.  OK, so that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but you surely get the gist.

Then:  Roots.

Now:  Who Do You Think You Are?, Finding Your Roots, Who’s In My Line?

Future:  Instant Connections, Ancestral Challenge, Genealogy Update.

OG 05

Then:  Hours and hours are spent traveling to and from each research repository.  Which adds up to dollars and DOLLARS.

Now:  You only travel for research if you can’t find what you’re looking for online.  And more often than not, you won’t be leaving your chair.

Future:  You only travel for research if you absolutely MUST.  More will be found online, thus less time spent in your car or on a plane.

OG 06

Then:  You’re overwhelmed with paper copies.

Now:  You’re overwhelmed by all the original records online.

Future:  You’re overwhelmed by immediate access to ANYTHING and EVERYTHING genealogy.

Then:  You need to make the most of your library visits; often working on several ancestors at once.  See counter-intuitive above.

Now:  You can research your ancestors ONE AT A TIME online.  Which is 100 times more productive and a whole lot less confusing.

Future:  You’ll research your one ancestor with much more ease and less mouse clicks.

OG 07

Then:  You either transcribe a document or make a paper copy of it.

Now:  You either download an image of a record or physically take a digital photograph of it.

Future:  99% digital, bay-bee!

Then:  Correspondence is mainly done via the United States Postal Service.  You can expect a reply in maybe a month or two.

Now:  Correspondence is mainly done via email.  You can expect a reply in maybe a week or two at the most.

Future:  Less and less correspondence will be required, with the immense amount of online offerings available.

OG 08

Then:  NOTHING is online because there IS no online!

Now:  5% of genealogical records are online.  Pffffft!

Future:  More than 6% of genealogical records are online.  Heh.

Then:  DNA is unreliable and not accepted as evidence in court.

Now:  DNA is heavily used in our justice system as well as for genealogical research.

Future:  More and more people will have their DNA tested, thus making it a more reliable and essential research tool.

OG 09

Then:  An Everton’s Genealogical Helper subscription is a MUST-HAVE.

Now:  An ancestry.com subscription is a MUST-HAVE.

Future:  An All-Access Online Genealogy subscription is a MUST-HAVE.

Then:  “Dear local genealogical society…”

Now:  Dear Myrtle!

Future:  “Dear XJ-1B Automated Genealogy Assistant, please locate for me…”

OG 10

Then:  “I found dozens of ancestors!  But it took me an entire YEAR.”

Now:  “I found hundreds of ancestors!!  In just a few months.”

Future:  “I found THOUSANDS of ancestors!!!  In a non-stop two-week online marathon session!”

Then:  Contacting and connecting to newly-found living relatives can be a chore.

Now:  Ancestry.com shaky-leaf hints, Facebook, email, Skype, etc.

Future:  ?????

OG 11

So, as you can see, I am VERY optimistic regarding the future of genealogical research; especially online.  The speed and sheer numbers of digital records being added DAILY is mind-boggling.

In this day and age, those not embracing all this technology are at a serious disadvantage.  Even if you visit a repository in person, the first thing they’ll have you do is get onto one of their computers to access what they’re already offering online anyway.  So, there’s no excuse NOT to be keeping up with the times and taking full advantage of EVERYTHING online research has to offer!!

OG 12

Then:  The Yugo.

Now:  The Prius.

Future:  Flying cars!!!

Eh, there’s hope yet…

 

Then:  John Brugliera, Genealogist.  Zero clients.

Now:  The Online Genealogist.  Several clients.

Future:  The Online Genealogist Co., Inc.  Hundreds of clients!!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

Got Brooklyn ancestors? a.k.a. Wanted: Eagle-eyed genealogists

BDE

If you have any Brooklyn residents in your family history, you’ll surely want to check out this valuable resource… the Brooklyn Daily Eagle.

With enormous thanks to the Brooklyn Public Library, we have free online access to much of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle from 1841 to 1955.  Fully searchable and browsable, this newspaper is chock full of great information of Brooklyn and her colorful residents throughout the years during New York City’s largest period of growth.

While the Eagle has the usual stuff – obituaries, marriage announcements, probate and other legal notices – there are extra goodies to be found within this cool little neighborhood paper.

How about sale of property due to unpaid taxes?

BDE2

These listings go on for PAGES!  Check out any Wednesday Eagle in 1860.  If it’s more than four pages, then you’ve got several MORE pages of Brooklyn properties, with owners and locations.  Look at all the names here!!

BDE3

And this is only ONE PAGE out of EIGHT!

In looking for your Brooklynite, start off with the OCR search.  Though don’t fully rely on that here; especially with all of the dots and numbers to confuse that iffy software.

BDE4

So, who’s got an Alden S. Crowell or Hugh G. Crosine in their line?

Also, in the Things You Wouldn’t Usually Expect in a Newspaper category, the BDE sporadically published a…

BDE5

This column for idle Brooklyn mail is broken down into a Ladies’ List and a Gentlemen’s List.  This is particularly noteworthy as there are so few resources in the mid-1800s that actually list HUNDREDS of women’s and wives’ names.  Look at those ladies’ names going all the way down to the center of the page!  Genealogy GOLD.

BDE6

Being on this list would mean you’ve moved, you’re in jail, you’ve gone underground, you’re dead or you’re just plain LAZY.  No matter, it’s proof of residence – at one time or another.  Well, if that actually IS your Della Hall listed above there…

I barely scratched the surface in this post, but can confidently say that the Brooklyn Daily Eagle is an excellent neighborhood newspaper which should be at the TOP of your research list for all things Brooklyn.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any Brooklyn family.  But it doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy electronically flipping through the pages of the Eagle; with over 100 years to choose from!

Whether it be in Brooklyn, NY or Brookline, MA,  I will research your family history – I’m The Online Genealogist!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

The Online Genealogist presents his Top 10…

Top-10-trophy2

I’ve been wanting to do a genealogy Top 10 for a while now, but for WHAT?  I’ve also had this link I’ve been wanting to weave into a post.  So, why not combine the two??

Old DiseasesWe’ve all seen several of these mostly-obsolete terms on the COD line of a death certificate or in an ancestor’s obituary.  And now with a few new newsworthy diseases lately, I thought the timing was perfect for such a blog post.  Not to mention Halloween’s coming up.  So, without further ado!…

The Online Genealogist proudly presents…  The Top 10 Old Diseases!…

#10:  Trench mouth!  They’re “painful ulcers found along gum line, caused by poor nutrition and poor hygiene”.  So, is trench mouth the disease itself or a fitting aftermath term for it?  Either way, it doesn’t sound very pleasant.

#9:  It’s a 3-way tie!… The American plague, Bronze John and dock fever are all — yellow fever!  Sometimes, a single medical term is not enough.

#8:  Cacospysy, which is an irregular pulse!  My favorites are the ones that sound much worse than they actually are.  Though, I’ve never had an irregular pulse nor do I know what may come after said pulse.  Moving along…

#7:  Then there’s strangery!  Which is a rupture.  The list doesn’t specify what’s been ruptured, so I’m assuming it’s all-encompassing.  “I’m sorry, but you have a serious case of strangery.”  “Oh no, doctor – did I rupture a disc?”  “No, I just think you’re a weirdo!”  <Tha-doomp>

#6:  And how would you like to suddenly come down with a case of… eel thingOr would it be THE eel thing?  No, it’s not one of those early ’60s fad dances; it’s erysipelas.  Cleared that up, huh?  Which turns out to be the desired result of this disease.

#5:  It’s a two-fer!  Or one may be a condition of the other?  St. Vitas dance is defined here as “ceaseless occurrence of rapid complex jerking movements performed involuntary aka Viper’s Dance”.  Then, chorea is a “disease characterized by convulsions, contortions and dancing”.  So, what happens here?  Does one with chorea go into the Viper’s Dance and then St. Vitas dance?  Or is everything occurring at ONCE??  It’s all so confusing!!!!

#4:  Here’s another one of those sounds-much-worse-than-it-is diseases – epitaxis!  If you have epitaxis, does that mean when you hail a cab, over 50 come out of nowhere?  No such luck, as it’s a nose bleed.  “And dun’t be bleedin’ inside my cab, now!”

#3:  Grocer’s itch?!?  Oh, so many things come to mind for THIS one.  But it’s probably a condition that’s been crossed off the CDC watchlist for quite some time now, being a “skin disease caused by mites in sugar or flour”.  And no, I won’t tell you what I was thinking.  The mites sound much worse.

#2:  Then there’s the dreaded sanguineous crust, which is a GOOD thing to have!  A scab means you’re healing nicely, so that wound did NOT get seriously infected and amputation wasn’t necessary.  See?  A GOOD thing!

#1:  My favorite, which I’ve never used as an excuse in the past!…  “Yeah, I won’t be into work today……  “I’ve got scrivener’s palsy“…… “Yeah, it’s really bad, I’m afraid. I’ve got a doctor’s appointment this afternoon.”  And unless your boss knows what a scrivener and palsy are, you’ll be free and clear!  If you don’t know either, you can refer to the above webpage for the description of this terrible affliction.  We should have a GoFundMe page for it, it’s so bad!

hand_writing

BONUS EXTRA DISEASE:  This one is inevitable.  For all of us.  Decrepitude.  “Feebleness due to old age” sounds so broad.  One person’s “feeble” is another’s “Doin’ OK for an OLD fart!”

And remember:  You have more of a chance of being comically flattened by a steamroller than catching ebola in America.  Well, right NOW, at least…

Hey, if you’re family history research is leaving YOU feeling like the aforementioned ribbon person, hire me… The Online Genealogist!  I’ll even throw in the guarantee… that I will NOT be giving you ebola!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

https://theonlinegenealogist.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/tog-web.jpg?w=535&h=366

A few recent genealogy items worthy of note

FaGraveFind A Grave (via Ancestry.com’s blog) announced that the 100,000,000th photo was uploaded onto their website.  Yeah, I could’ve written it as “100 Million”, but look at all those ZEROES!

That’s a great milestone and pretty impressive for a website that many originally blew off as a celebrity-worship “ooooo, this is where he’s buried!” novelty destination that would be gone in a few years.  But after 19?  Boy, did they prove ME – errr, THEM wrong!!  Find A Grave is a definite boon for genealogists, historians and the entire goth community!  Me eating crow.  Poorly.

And has THIS finally been successfully proven?

Mail OnlineMr. Edwards claims he was able to extract DNA from a shawl found by one of Jack’s victims. How??  Ya gotta buy his BOOK to find out!!

JackEh, in all fairness, the article is rather meaty and has several photos, so I will not mock.  Thank you, Mr. Edwards!  The free plug for his BOOK should make up for any ill will.  Fascinating stuff, for sure!

And NOT to sound like a broken record regarding online records, but here’s MORE!!

FamilySearchScroll down a bit for the numbers.  FamilySearch.com is surely living up to their promise of a continuous flow of digitized records – indexed and non-indexed!  So, instead of waiting for the entire indexing process to catch up to the records (a few years??), they keep adding all sorts of goodies for us to BROWSE through.  Did I ever mention I love to browse? 

Well, even with all the indexes, I often end up browsing anyway.  Whether it be to find the actual ancestor I’m looking for or learn more of what and who’s around that ancestor if some promising results came up in the initial search.

These two FamilySearch items are of special note to U.S. researchers, as they are NEW sources; the others were updates to existing collections.

FS New 01FS New 02I’ll close out with something I came across today, from nearly 100 years ago, it’s the 1915 Norwich, Connecticut Tax List via the Norwich Bulletin!

NorwichThis is a great mid-decade resource for placing your Norwich, CT ancestor.  Check it out.  You could actually find someone you “know” in there!

But if your ancestors never lived in Norwich (99.9999% of us), I can still help you out!  Hire ME — The Online Genealogist!!!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

Nothin’ like a few million FREE IMAGES to spice up your family story!

Flickr - IA

The Internet Archive folks recently posted over 2.5 million IMAGES onto the photo-sharing website, Flickr.  Extracted from thousands of books originally searchable by text ONLY at Internet Archive.  Now the images can be searched on Flickr!

Why is this a big deal for genealogists?  We get perty pictures to go with our family histories!  Even though they are mostly “old” images past copyright, you’ll  surely discover a visual gem or two to accompany your ancestors’ stories.

Whether it be something specific like a photo of a long-gone family homestead or generic such as a period steam liner used to illustrate an immigrant family’s trans-Atlantic journey – it’s probably in there.  Remember, we’re talking over two-and-a-half million images here!

So, if you had MacLarens in Windsor, Ontario around 1900, they may have been “manufacturing” cheese…

MacLaren

Or perhaps some of your family lived near Chicago’s Garfield Park.  Here’s a close-up of that area from 1921.  There are several other neighborhoods available for viewing/downloading!

Garfield

Maybe you’re the 3rd-great-grandchild of Dr. P. Edward Seguin, who set up practice in Royalton, Minnesota.  Do a Flickr search for him now and his photo comes right up!  He’s the one with the facial hair (heh).

Seguin 01

Then you hit a link and the original book is shown in its entirety; you’ll see the image in context and maybe find a few more words to go with your Man of 10,000 Lakes.

Seguin 02

Nice stash there, guy.  Oh, and check out his goateed colleague, George Allen Love, M.D. — Dr. Love!  (And yes, I love stuff “finding me” like this.)  Time to break out some Kiss!…

And while most early records aren’t OCR-friendly, they are definitely considered to be images.  Such as the below Allen County, Indiana Circuit Court Index from 1824.  (Hi ACPL!)  All images are downloadable, with Flickr’s excellent choices ranging from thumbnail to original.  I always grab the original, then re-size that as needed.

Allen 02

You can also download several stock photo-type items without the worry of being busted by the copyright police!  Like this large uppercase “C” for your the background of your Carlson Family homepage.

C

Anyway, you get the idea.  That is to NOT overlook this incredible Flickr/Internet Archive e-collection while gathering all sorts of images for your family story.

Then there’s this one image we will ALL use when we finish our family histories and they’re complete.

Adam & Eve

HA – GOTCHA!!!

Oh, and PhotoShop, etc. can also straighten images to make them even PERTIER!

 

And if YOU think that your ancestry can be traced all the way back to Adam & Eve, do NOT hire me — the Online Genealogist!!

TOG WEB

 

 johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

The Online Genealogist sez “Know Your Geography!”

Burlington-Plattsburgh

I don’t usually call out others on their blog postings, but being the huge map hound that I am and more so given the source, I just had to here.

G-Bank

And my comment…

G-Bank 2

My question is this…  If a great point is made using a poor example, does that bring the credibility of that point down a few notches?

After knowing the geography, is it really such a great point; especially coming from a blogger that represents a subscription website featuring newspapers from all over the country?

G-Bank 3

Given Mr. Kemp’s impressive resume, shouldn’t he have known this and chosen a better example for his sorta-almost-kinda-great point?

Now, if this had been penned by a newbie genealogist or obviously-hired content writer {ahem}, I wouldn’t even be blogging about it.  But we’re barraged with so many tips and the like online, we have to really be selective in what to use…and what to TOSS.

Sorry, Tom – I’m not meaning to put you in front of the virtual firing squad or anything, but your post happens to be a PERFECT example of the point I’m trying to make here.  Which will hopefully be great.  “Any last words?…”

 

And if you don’t know that Burlington, Vermont is in Chittenden County, but Chittenden, Vermont is in Rutland County or that St. Louis and East St. Louis are in different states, you may need to hire ME – The Online Genealogist!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

Genealogy research without these will leave you LOST

 

 

GenInTime

In reviewing GenealogyInTime‘s Top 100 Websites for 2014, one of MY most-used sites for research wasn’t on here – Old Maps Online.

OMO

Old Maps Online is more of a collection of historical map collections; I’m talking AMAZING collections, most notably Cartography Associates’ David Rumsey Map Collection and Boston Public Library’s Norman B. Leventhal Map Center.

If you don’t use maps in your research, why the heck not?  Historical maps often provide excellent clues when tracking your ancestors; especially if they remained in one place for an extended period of time.

Streets, rivers and hills; roads, streams and mountains; any of them could be named after your ancestor.  Williams Drive, Pierson Hill, Carson’s Crossing, Skinner River.  All named for somebody.  Or a family of somebodies if several generations lived in an area.

You could also check out some of those very detailed county atlases from the late 1800s and find exactly where your ancestor lived.  I love aimlessly browsing through these.

David Rumsey

Given the time that these county atlases were published, many can be used as an 1890 Federal Census replacement of sorts.

Maps should be one of your FIRST stops in a research project.  Whether you know the area or not.

I’ve discovered SO MUCH by utilizing geographical genealogy!

 

And if you’re having trouble finding your way in ANY aspect of your genealogical research, I can help to point you in the right direction!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

Family History Humor, featuring Jean E. Allogee

 

 

Hiney

While researching, I frequently come across records that give me a chuckle; mostly bad name puns and the like.

Or those that are comical all in themselves.  Such as the above 1850 Federal Census extract for Rome, PA.

Yes, Henry Hiney, his wife Sally Ann Hiney and their presumed five children.  George Hiney at the bottom (sorry) could be a younger brother of Henry Hiney.

But the kid’s names are even better… Zepheminah Hiney! C.C. Hiney!!

City directories are a GOLDMINE for such silliness.  Or if not, I just add my own.

Like Jesus Christ is NOT in Buffalo!

No Jesus Christ

He should be between Jacob the carpenter and the John on Clinton Street.

But then I thought, Well, DUH!  Of course Jesus would be UNLISTED!!

And what’s a directory without a few good name and occupation combos?  This from the 1911 Boston Directory.

George Speede Boston 1911

Now, what ELSE would George L. Speed be doing for work??

And a 1932 Columbia, NH entry.

Columbia Directory 1932

E.E. Cass: “You wanna work on my farm and your name is Guy LeGro??  You’re HIRED!!

You know, that’s how many surnames came to be in the first place.

“I am a blacksmith and will forth hence be known as Mr. Smith!”

“Yes, and I own a mill.  Instead of ‘Very Friendly Mill Man’,  I hereby change my name to Bud Miller!!”

“Oh, but I am a DOG CATCHER!  Forthwith and beyond -”

Wait, that doesn’t work out; damn!  Eh, you get my gist.

And maybe we could have farmer Guy above “translate” this ad page from the 1915 Lebanon Directory.

Leb 1915

“Yeah, I need my horse renovated…”

“We’re Rogers & Hubbard!  Your one-stop shop for bone-based fertilizer!”

Cow invigorator??  I don’t even wanna know what that’s supposed to do!  Boviagra?

And don’t forget “Books free. Good books too.”  Ha!

I saw this in unsold ad space in a 1928 Lancaster, NH directory.

LOOK

A raise of hands…

How many of you have come across typographical errors in city directories?

Yep, everyone but that one dude in the back there.  “Yo!  Henry Hiney!!  Research much??”

So, how many people have THEY offended over the years in hundreds of localities across the country?  They should be apologizing here instead of looking for ad dollars!  OK, rant over.

From the Federal Naturalization Index…

Superfine

Lewis Superfine from Russia!  Wonder what his Russian name really was.

And I’ll leave you with this almost-triple-play…

Russell

Yes, it’s Russel Russ, of Russell, NY!

 

Thank you ancestry.com and familysearch.org for most of the above images!

Besides being screen captures, these items have not been altered in ANY WAY.  “If you don’t believe me, you can look it up yourself!” (King of California, 2007)  That’s why I always include WHERE they’re extracted FROM.

 

Because that’s just what The Online Genealogist does.

And don’t forget my Free Quickie Online Ancestor Search!!!  Details upper right.

I would love to research for you!

 

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

Who says parents don’t play favorites??

 

Daughters Gets Dollar

For those being-able-to-read-handwriting challenged…

“Seventhly, I give and bequeath to my daughter Lydia Allison one dollar.

Eighthly, I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary Kilton one dollar.”

OK, so this was over 150 years ago, but still!  His sons got all the land and another received $100.

Is there any significance to this, besides our being able to use the wonderful info for family-connecting?  Would it have been considered an insult to receive such a pathetic inheritance amount?  Even accounting for inflation, it’s only around 25 bucks!  Was their father “snubbing them”, or was it the norm back then; the sons receiving all the loot while the daughters get pennies?

 

Speaking of pennies, that’s how much it will cost you for research compared to many other genealogists out there; give me a shout!!

 

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

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