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John Brugliera

Archive for the tag “births”

John B’s Family Research Fox Pass #17

oops

This (unintentional!) genealogy goof-up was early on in researching my own family; more specifically, my BRUGLIERA surname.  The (totally unforeseen!) error shall be filed under: I Shook The Family Tree A Bit Too Hard or Way To Go, Gram!

In “starting with myself”, I knew my first stop was to see Grandma Brugliera.  Unfortunately, my Great-Grandmother B died just a few years earlier; she would’ve had loads of family info and stories.

Upon asking, my Grandma pulled out some pencil-written notes on scrap paper.  “Your Grandfather had started it a while before he died.”  Wow!  All sorts of Brugliera relatives and notes about them – nice!

Prior to that visit, I was on the fence about whether I was going to pursue this genealogy thing any further.  With all sorts of other things happening at that time, it was surely the push that was needed.  And the rest is (family) history!

Grandpa must’ve “knew” one of his grandchildren would be interested in knowing their ancestors more; it was merely a coincidence that I, the eldest, took on that challenge, continuing right where he left off.  Anytime I would visit Gram, I’d gather a few more pieces of information, memories and excellent research clues.

So, one day she’s rattling off family facts and names…

“You know your Uncle ‘Frank’ was born in Brockton?”

“Yep, got that at the vital records office in Boston last month.”

“Oh, and there’s the son that his unmarried daughter [my cousin ‘Ann’] had and gave up for adoption.”

“Uhhhh, no – didn’t have him.”

“Yeah, he’d be a Brugliera; she being unmarried, right?”

“Errr – I guess.”  Not really knowing how to answer that one.

“Then there’s another uncle on your grandfather’s mother’s side….”

And on she went.

I was kind of surprised that “Ann” had a baby and didn’t keep it, but then it was no surprise as I wasn’t all that close with her and her siblings.  I gave it little thought afterwards.  Until it was B Family Tree time…

Using a very crude early knockoff of Microsoft Word, I had compiled a 10-page “collection” of worldwide Bruglieras – past and present.  I was very proud of my first family history, as more B’s in there were connected to others than not.  I made stapled copies and handed them out to several relatives.

IMG_7275

In keeping this family compilation manageable, I only included those that actually have/had the Brugliera name.  Most of those decisions were easy, but then I came to the mystery baby boy of “Ann”.  Should he be included?  Sure, why not?  He IS a Brugliera, so I’ll call him “unknown son Brugliera” with the adoption notation and leave it at that.

A few months later, I get a letter in the mail.  It’s my cousin “Ann”, and she is some PISSED.  “Why did you do this to me?  Now my PARENTS know about this baby!”  Uh, what – they DIDN’T?!?

Oh.  No.

Boy, did I feel like a total dope.  I didn’t even THINK of that possibility – damn!

I replied to “Ann” with an apology and explanation.  “Gram was helping me with the B Tree and your son was brought up.  I made a note and she continued on.  Gram mentioned it so matter-of-factly, I had erroneously assumed that it was public knowledge and that I was probably the last in the family to know about your son and subsequent adoption.”

I ended it with “You know, it was just Gram being Gram.  Your son will be removed in the next revised Brugliera Family Tree.”

I heard nothing more from “Ann”, and the next time I saw her, oddly enough, was at Grandma B’s funeral.  After greeting her, I again apologized for the mess I caused.  She said “Oh, that’s been long resolved.  We’re all cool; don’t worry about it!”  And that was the end of that.  Though I always include him in the grand total…

B Tree Total

That B number is WELL over 174 now.  And counting…

Thanks for all your family tree help, Gram!  As I said, if it weren’t for you, I may currently be into some other “-ology”, such as entomology or gynecology.  “You’re a women’s doctor?”  “No, that’s ‘genealogist‘.”

Me & GramOh, nice monkey suit there, buddy.

The moral here is to tread lightly when speaking with living family members about OTHER living family members.  Even though it may come off as “Oh, everybody knows THIS!”, it may not be so.  Especially the living family members that are CLOSEST to the other living family members.  Got all that??

 

If not, you can hire me, The Online Genealogist!  And… I… will… repeat… it… all… much… much… more… slowly.  Hey, I get paid by the hour – heh.

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

 

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Why is the 1900 Federal Census the only one that actually has the month and year of birth?

1900 Census

I don’t know; I thought you guys had an idea.

Census years prior to and after 1900 only show AGE.  Why is that?

I’ve always thought that was a great feature and have been wondering why the Feds went back to AGE only.  I mean, they could’ve made it YEAR and AGE if the month entries were giving them headaches.  Yes, in typical governmental redundancy, the age is also listed in 1900.  Apparently, for those who couldn’t do the math!

Also curious is that for 1910, one of the few changes from 1900 was the removal of that month and year of birth!

So, hopping online, I go directly to the government’s official census website.

Hmmmm, this “shake-up” probably had something to do with the 1910 reversion to AGE only.

1900 Census 02

So, I do a quickie Google search and got only the fact that in 1910, the birth month and year columns were gone.  But not why.

Well, I really hate to Google and run, but as of right now, I’m satisfied with “Month/Year fell victim of governmental reorganization”, which is a very vague and lame sort-of catch-all reason.

Any 1900/1910 Federal Census experts out there with another explanation??

 

Now, you could always HIRE the online genealogist, if this mystery is really really bothering you now.

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

It’s a Mocavo Two-fer!

Mocavo

First, big news that Mocavo has been purchased by FindMyPast.

Here is the full announcement on their home page.

I’m almost ashamed to say that I’m not subscribed to Mocavo or FindMyPastAlmost.  I mean seriously, how many of these paid-subscription websites must a genealogist cough up the bucks for?  And with some of them, you do some serious coughing!  But that’s for another post…

Funny that those two were next on my “genealogy sites to subscribe to” list, but only if I really really really really needed to.  As Mocavo is more of a search engine, I’ve been able to locate the information on my own, after their Free Forever search comes back with the results.  Same for the newspapers on FindMyPast – many are already available online for free.

So, what does this marriage mean for us?  A bad name like FindMo’Cavo??

Well, to start, a combined website/yearly subscription would be nice!  *COUGH COUGH*  (The till is dry.)

I’m sure FindMyPast and Mocavo joined forces for the very reason I’ve yet to subscribe to either; they really don’t have enough exclusive material to warrant the extra expense.  It’s almost like they’re trying to snatch up the “scraps” that Ancestry and FamilySearch (and to an extent, Fold3) don’t want.

FMP/M will have plenty to say in these coming months.  But will their combined efforts be enough to get me off the fence?

And did you know Mocavo will scan your genealogy-related books, diaries, photos, etc. for FREE?  (Love that word.  FREEEEEE.)

Simply click that Contribute button on their navigation bar.  (Or you could always just click the clickable “Contribute” I made right there.)

I recently found two local town landowners’ annual reports at a church rummage sale and mailed them to Mocavo for them to scan.  Upon doing so, they’ll add these to their collection of OCR searchable items for ALL!  It’s a GREAT service and I’m hoping that many subscribers (or not) will take them up on this offer.  So, keep an eye out, as there’s lots of genealogical stuff out there for scanning!

One very nice Mocavo niche is the central availability of such annual town reports, many of which contain births, marriages and deaths recorded during that past year.  (Obviously, better chances of seeing those for smaller towns.  Cities will simply give you the grand totals.)  Though again, with some digging, you can find most of these annuals online elsewhere..,yes, for free.

But you probably don’t want to send Mocavo anything that’s near and dear to your heart.  Especially books, as they say they need to remove the binding for better scanning, which makes perfect sense.  Read the fine print.

I’ll let you know when “my” town records come up online there.  (Supposedly, they’ll contact me AND give me credit for the data.)

So, let this be an open challenge to FindMyPast/Mocavo

Knock me off the fence!!!

 

T-O-G Biz 01

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