The Online Genealogist

John Brugliera

Archive for the category “Genealogy Tips”

The Online Genealogist asks “How do you find her maiden name?”

Maiden Name 01First off, many thanks to MAD’s Al Jaffee for the above extreme, but fitting image.  Found elsewhere online, uncredited.  I’d recognize his drawing style anywhere.

One of the most challenging aspects of genealogical research is discovering the maiden name of a female ancestor.  How many times have we seen a compiled family history, with entries such as this?…

Maiden Name 02

Yes, the dreaded blank line after the young lady’s given name.  Even esteemed genealogical societies’ published family histories aren’t immune.  In fact, it’s more surprising if ALL maiden names were known.  Why is that?  Several reasons, but near the top would surely be the lack of female records in general.  The overwhelming majority of early records feature men, men, men, men…

It was glaringly apparent in those Lebanon, NH town records I was looking at last week.  There may be an occasional “widow Reynolds” mentioned in a new road survey or “Sally McNeil” in the town poor house, but 99% of the names in there are William, Daniel, Thomas, Ziba or some other equally manly moniker.

One of the best ways I’ve found maiden names are through the Federal Census records – mainly 1850 and on when all members of a household are listed as opposed to the head only (MAN) that was there in 1840 and before.  The most recent censuses are even better.  “How so?”, you ask?  “How about an example?”, I answer.  Here’s one from the 1930 Federal Census…

Maiden Name 03

Any guesses for what the wife of Peter Gioia, Pauline’s maiden name is?  Score 1000 points if you yell “Messina!  Messina!  Messina!!!”  I’ve found SO many maiden names in this manner.  It could be a maternal nephew or bonus multiple in-laws, as in the above Boston snippage.  The maiden name is right there!

And if you’re looking at 1850, 1860 or 1870 , where the relationship to the head of household wasn’t included, no need to fret!  If I see an older Mrs. Wilson living with a Richardson family, I’ll most definitely be looking at Wilsons in the area as possible/probable parents for Mrs. Richardson, which of course, would provide her maiden name.

Other great maiden name hints?  Middle names!  Oh, and OBITS!!  But those are whole other posts…

 

If you’re looking for a hard-to-find maiden name, you’ll find that I may find out what that is.   I’m the Online Genealogist!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

 

 

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Great genealogy information and unique history snapshots are found in town records!

 

Leb Town Records 01
FamilySearch’s impressive online town records collection comes in very handy when looking for earlier vital records, town meetings, warnings out, etc.   As most volumes are NOT indexed by FS, you’ll need to browse and manually hunt down what genealogy items you are looking for.  Although many of the “physical” books DO contain varying indexes within.

I also find that reading through these town records provides an interesting picture of what life was like some 200+ years ago in a particular area.  Even more fascinating is when they’re your town records.

For instance, I can’t imagine Lebanon, NH bringing up these items during a recent meeting.

Leb Town Records 02

I’ve been living here for over 12 years and I have yet to see any swine running around loose on the streets.   And the punishment for stray piggies?

Lebanon Town Recs v.1 075

Talk about government pork – quite literally!  Also in The More Things Change, The More They Stay The Same Dept…

Lebanon Town Recs v.1 002

Let’s meet to specifically dismiss the meeting – yes!!  Or better yet…

Lebanon Town Recs v.1 004

What?  A government getting NOTHING DONE?!?  Nah!  Can’t happen!  OK, I’ll try and dial the sarcasm down some.

But when they DO get some work done, it comes out like this.

Lebanon Town Recs v.1 007

These nine lines could easily be whittled down to three.  But not by the government.  I’d think using such big words back in 1768 would more likely “discommode the inhabitants”.

Also within Lebanon’s town records are road surveys, which are impossible to use now.

Leb Town Records 04

Lots of long-gone trees and rock piles!

Here’s another challenging item brought up in one of the meetings…

Leb Town Records 03

I’m guessing this pre-dates the first town library, as that would surely be the job of the head librarian.  Then again, if they had a library, this wouldn’t be an issue!

They could also use the library for a good dictionary or two.

Lebanon Town Recs v.1 025

Though it looks rather  intentional.  A Town Clerk doubling as the County Comedian? 

Lebanon Town Recs v.1 006

So, who Wood have thunk that town records would contain so much neat stuff??

 

I did, but I’m The Online Genealogist!!  Hire me as I have NO problem delving into town records!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

 

The Online Genealogist asks “How many differents ways can you spell ‘Shakespeare’?”

Answer:  THOUSANDS!!!!!

Shakespeare 01

This 1869 book goes above and beyond in exemplifying the various ways ONE SURNAME can be found in various genealogical documents.  And the author, George Wise, includes them ALL in here!

Shakespeare 02

Sheyxpeer, Scheykesspierre and everything in between.  There are 15 more full pages like this!!

Why is this overkill of Shakespeare surname variations important to family history research? Because YOU will most likely discover your ancestors’ surnames are not set in Stone.  Or Stoan.  Or Stowen, even!

I’ve heard far too many researchers swear up and down that there is only one CORRECT WAY to spell their ancestor’s surname.  While that may be true, nobody told that to the census taker, town clerk or city directory editor.  And because of this, you will have to look at any possible spelling variations of that surname in those records.  Even your ancestors themselves may be lousy at spelling and not realize that Cammbelle is NOT the “correct” Campbell.

And yes, even a world-renowned writer can have trouble with his own name in a SINGLE DOCUMENT!

Shakespeare 03

Ya just gotta love Mr. Wise’s sense of humor, as shown in the book’s title at the top of each page.

Shakespeare 04

Shakespeare 05

The bottom line here is that NOT seeking surname variations is akin to wearing research blinders where you will limit yourself and probably NOT find hoo you are looking for.

As with the author, the Wise surname is prevalent in my ancestral lineage. If I had ONLY stubbornly searched for Wise, I would’ve missed out on several records that were listed under Wyze, Weiss, Whys, etc.  “As a Whiez man once told me…”

You will tend to find that most misspellings will be a phonetic version of the name, so take a piece of blank paper, start saying the surname out loud and write down EVERY possibility you can come up with.  You may not end up with 4000 like George Wise did, but you will have at least a dozen or so likely alternate spellings to keep in mind if you can’t locate it under the “correct” Shakespeare.

In closing, I can confidently state that the surname you’re looking for WILL have variations in some of the records you refer to.  Neglecting to take into account those “misspelled” surnames would be a serious handicap in your genealogy research.

And if you have John Smith as an ancestor, don’t believe for one second you are immune from this blog post’s message.

Shakespeare 06

…Smiff, Snnith, Sumith, Smiyth, Schmith…

 

And if YOU are having trouble finding your ancestor (correctly-spelled surname or not); hire ME – The Online Genealogist!!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

 

Got Brooklyn ancestors? a.k.a. Wanted: Eagle-eyed genealogists

BDE

If you have any Brooklyn residents in your family history, you’ll surely want to check out this valuable resource… the Brooklyn Daily Eagle.

With enormous thanks to the Brooklyn Public Library, we have free online access to much of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle from 1841 to 1955.  Fully searchable and browsable, this newspaper is chock full of great information of Brooklyn and her colorful residents throughout the years during New York City’s largest period of growth.

While the Eagle has the usual stuff – obituaries, marriage announcements, probate and other legal notices – there are extra goodies to be found within this cool little neighborhood paper.

How about sale of property due to unpaid taxes?

BDE2

These listings go on for PAGES!  Check out any Wednesday Eagle in 1860.  If it’s more than four pages, then you’ve got several MORE pages of Brooklyn properties, with owners and locations.  Look at all the names here!!

BDE3

And this is only ONE PAGE out of EIGHT!

In looking for your Brooklynite, start off with the OCR search.  Though don’t fully rely on that here; especially with all of the dots and numbers to confuse that iffy software.

BDE4

So, who’s got an Alden S. Crowell or Hugh G. Crosine in their line?

Also, in the Things You Wouldn’t Usually Expect in a Newspaper category, the BDE sporadically published a…

BDE5

This column for idle Brooklyn mail is broken down into a Ladies’ List and a Gentlemen’s List.  This is particularly noteworthy as there are so few resources in the mid-1800s that actually list HUNDREDS of women’s and wives’ names.  Look at those ladies’ names going all the way down to the center of the page!  Genealogy GOLD.

BDE6

Being on this list would mean you’ve moved, you’re in jail, you’ve gone underground, you’re dead or you’re just plain LAZY.  No matter, it’s proof of residence – at one time or another.  Well, if that actually IS your Della Hall listed above there…

I barely scratched the surface in this post, but can confidently say that the Brooklyn Daily Eagle is an excellent neighborhood newspaper which should be at the TOP of your research list for all things Brooklyn.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any Brooklyn family.  But it doesn’t mean I can’t enjoy electronically flipping through the pages of the Eagle; with over 100 years to choose from!

Whether it be in Brooklyn, NY or Brookline, MA,  I will research your family history – I’m The Online Genealogist!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

The Online Genealogist presents his Top 10…

Top-10-trophy2

I’ve been wanting to do a genealogy Top 10 for a while now, but for WHAT?  I’ve also had this link I’ve been wanting to weave into a post.  So, why not combine the two??

Old DiseasesWe’ve all seen several of these mostly-obsolete terms on the COD line of a death certificate or in an ancestor’s obituary.  And now with a few new newsworthy diseases lately, I thought the timing was perfect for such a blog post.  Not to mention Halloween’s coming up.  So, without further ado!…

The Online Genealogist proudly presents…  The Top 10 Old Diseases!…

#10:  Trench mouth!  They’re “painful ulcers found along gum line, caused by poor nutrition and poor hygiene”.  So, is trench mouth the disease itself or a fitting aftermath term for it?  Either way, it doesn’t sound very pleasant.

#9:  It’s a 3-way tie!… The American plague, Bronze John and dock fever are all — yellow fever!  Sometimes, a single medical term is not enough.

#8:  Cacospysy, which is an irregular pulse!  My favorites are the ones that sound much worse than they actually are.  Though, I’ve never had an irregular pulse nor do I know what may come after said pulse.  Moving along…

#7:  Then there’s strangery!  Which is a rupture.  The list doesn’t specify what’s been ruptured, so I’m assuming it’s all-encompassing.  “I’m sorry, but you have a serious case of strangery.”  “Oh no, doctor – did I rupture a disc?”  “No, I just think you’re a weirdo!”  <Tha-doomp>

#6:  And how would you like to suddenly come down with a case of… eel thingOr would it be THE eel thing?  No, it’s not one of those early ’60s fad dances; it’s erysipelas.  Cleared that up, huh?  Which turns out to be the desired result of this disease.

#5:  It’s a two-fer!  Or one may be a condition of the other?  St. Vitas dance is defined here as “ceaseless occurrence of rapid complex jerking movements performed involuntary aka Viper’s Dance”.  Then, chorea is a “disease characterized by convulsions, contortions and dancing”.  So, what happens here?  Does one with chorea go into the Viper’s Dance and then St. Vitas dance?  Or is everything occurring at ONCE??  It’s all so confusing!!!!

#4:  Here’s another one of those sounds-much-worse-than-it-is diseases – epitaxis!  If you have epitaxis, does that mean when you hail a cab, over 50 come out of nowhere?  No such luck, as it’s a nose bleed.  “And dun’t be bleedin’ inside my cab, now!”

#3:  Grocer’s itch?!?  Oh, so many things come to mind for THIS one.  But it’s probably a condition that’s been crossed off the CDC watchlist for quite some time now, being a “skin disease caused by mites in sugar or flour”.  And no, I won’t tell you what I was thinking.  The mites sound much worse.

#2:  Then there’s the dreaded sanguineous crust, which is a GOOD thing to have!  A scab means you’re healing nicely, so that wound did NOT get seriously infected and amputation wasn’t necessary.  See?  A GOOD thing!

#1:  My favorite, which I’ve never used as an excuse in the past!…  “Yeah, I won’t be into work today……  “I’ve got scrivener’s palsy“…… “Yeah, it’s really bad, I’m afraid. I’ve got a doctor’s appointment this afternoon.”  And unless your boss knows what a scrivener and palsy are, you’ll be free and clear!  If you don’t know either, you can refer to the above webpage for the description of this terrible affliction.  We should have a GoFundMe page for it, it’s so bad!

hand_writing

BONUS EXTRA DISEASE:  This one is inevitable.  For all of us.  Decrepitude.  “Feebleness due to old age” sounds so broad.  One person’s “feeble” is another’s “Doin’ OK for an OLD fart!”

And remember:  You have more of a chance of being comically flattened by a steamroller than catching ebola in America.  Well, right NOW, at least…

Hey, if you’re family history research is leaving YOU feeling like the aforementioned ribbon person, hire me… The Online Genealogist!  I’ll even throw in the guarantee… that I will NOT be giving you ebola!

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

https://theonlinegenealogist.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/tog-web.jpg?w=535&h=366

John B’s Family Research Fox Pass #17

oops

This (unintentional!) genealogy goof-up was early on in researching my own family; more specifically, my BRUGLIERA surname.  The (totally unforeseen!) error shall be filed under: I Shook The Family Tree A Bit Too Hard or Way To Go, Gram!

In “starting with myself”, I knew my first stop was to see Grandma Brugliera.  Unfortunately, my Great-Grandmother B died just a few years earlier; she would’ve had loads of family info and stories.

Upon asking, my Grandma pulled out some pencil-written notes on scrap paper.  “Your Grandfather had started it a while before he died.”  Wow!  All sorts of Brugliera relatives and notes about them – nice!

Prior to that visit, I was on the fence about whether I was going to pursue this genealogy thing any further.  With all sorts of other things happening at that time, it was surely the push that was needed.  And the rest is (family) history!

Grandpa must’ve “knew” one of his grandchildren would be interested in knowing their ancestors more; it was merely a coincidence that I, the eldest, took on that challenge, continuing right where he left off.  Anytime I would visit Gram, I’d gather a few more pieces of information, memories and excellent research clues.

So, one day she’s rattling off family facts and names…

“You know your Uncle ‘Frank’ was born in Brockton?”

“Yep, got that at the vital records office in Boston last month.”

“Oh, and there’s the son that his unmarried daughter [my cousin ‘Ann’] had and gave up for adoption.”

“Uhhhh, no – didn’t have him.”

“Yeah, he’d be a Brugliera; she being unmarried, right?”

“Errr – I guess.”  Not really knowing how to answer that one.

“Then there’s another uncle on your grandfather’s mother’s side….”

And on she went.

I was kind of surprised that “Ann” had a baby and didn’t keep it, but then it was no surprise as I wasn’t all that close with her and her siblings.  I gave it little thought afterwards.  Until it was B Family Tree time…

Using a very crude early knockoff of Microsoft Word, I had compiled a 10-page “collection” of worldwide Bruglieras – past and present.  I was very proud of my first family history, as more B’s in there were connected to others than not.  I made stapled copies and handed them out to several relatives.

IMG_7275

In keeping this family compilation manageable, I only included those that actually have/had the Brugliera name.  Most of those decisions were easy, but then I came to the mystery baby boy of “Ann”.  Should he be included?  Sure, why not?  He IS a Brugliera, so I’ll call him “unknown son Brugliera” with the adoption notation and leave it at that.

A few months later, I get a letter in the mail.  It’s my cousin “Ann”, and she is some PISSED.  “Why did you do this to me?  Now my PARENTS know about this baby!”  Uh, what – they DIDN’T?!?

Oh.  No.

Boy, did I feel like a total dope.  I didn’t even THINK of that possibility – damn!

I replied to “Ann” with an apology and explanation.  “Gram was helping me with the B Tree and your son was brought up.  I made a note and she continued on.  Gram mentioned it so matter-of-factly, I had erroneously assumed that it was public knowledge and that I was probably the last in the family to know about your son and subsequent adoption.”

I ended it with “You know, it was just Gram being Gram.  Your son will be removed in the next revised Brugliera Family Tree.”

I heard nothing more from “Ann”, and the next time I saw her, oddly enough, was at Grandma B’s funeral.  After greeting her, I again apologized for the mess I caused.  She said “Oh, that’s been long resolved.  We’re all cool; don’t worry about it!”  And that was the end of that.  Though I always include him in the grand total…

B Tree Total

That B number is WELL over 174 now.  And counting…

Thanks for all your family tree help, Gram!  As I said, if it weren’t for you, I may currently be into some other “-ology”, such as entomology or gynecology.  “You’re a women’s doctor?”  “No, that’s ‘genealogist‘.”

Me & GramOh, nice monkey suit there, buddy.

The moral here is to tread lightly when speaking with living family members about OTHER living family members.  Even though it may come off as “Oh, everybody knows THIS!”, it may not be so.  Especially the living family members that are CLOSEST to the other living family members.  Got all that??

 

If not, you can hire me, The Online Genealogist!  And… I… will… repeat… it… all… much… much… more… slowly.  Hey, I get paid by the hour – heh.

JohnBrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

TOG WEB

 

Darling Ross, and other curious names found in our genealogy research

Darling Ross

How would you like to be a guy and have to go through life with “Darling” as your first name?  “Hey, how ’bout hitchin’ up that team of horses?…Dar-ling!”  And did Mrs. Ross call him “Darling” or “Dahhhhhhrling”??

As family history researchers, we see unusual names like this quite frequently, giving us a chuckle as we quickly scan by, looking for the non-Darling Ross names in the search for our elusive ancestors.  The difference with me?  I save them… for posting here later on!

So, how did Mr. Ross end up with Darling as his first name?  Longtime genealogists will surmise that it’s not based on his sparkling personality; more likely a mother’s or grandmother’s maiden name.  Colonial surnames were sometimes used as first names for later children.  If I were researching our darling Darling here, I would surely be looking at possible Darling families living nearby.

But enough with the helpful hints – on with the silliness!

Appropriate names are always fun.  What ELSE would you expect this fellow to do for work?

Federal Census 1850 Carpenter 2

From the 1923 Bristol, CT Directory, a confused worker…

Bristol CT Directory 1923 61aIs he an employee or is he the BOSS?

Do you think this Norwich, CT family has a problem trying to sit still?

Norwich Bulletin 19150121 09a

And of course, staying in Norwich, we can’t forget marriages.

Isn’t this one of those Pacific Islands in the middle of nowhere?

Norwich Bulletin 19150218 07a

Is this a couple or a birdwatching guide?

Norwich Bulletin 19140928 07a

This second couple went WAY out of their way to offset “what people may think”.

Norwich Bulletin 19140930 07a

…and this couple, uhhhhh – didn’t!

Norwich Bulletin 19141014 07a

Happiness and Gaiety, not far behind!

Norwich Bulletin 19141104 11a

But in the 1919 Brockton, MA Directory, someone is not quite sure.

Brockton Directory 1919 86 DionAnd ending off with a couple in Buxton, ME… marriage expectation a bit too high?

Living & Loving 2Was the Dunnel of Love, but now Mrs. Love Lane.  Living and Love in church records – yes!

 

Amongst our Living, I’d Love to research family histories for you!

 

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

How many genealogy pay sites does one really need to subscribe to?

Ancestry

I wonder if any fellow researcher has determined how much it would cost per year to subscribe to ALL of the major annual-payment genealogy websites.  What do you think that dollar amount would tally up to?

Just off the top of my head, I’d say $1,000 would be a good ballpark figure.  Of course, only the (wealthy!) genealogist who needs access to EVERYTHING would ever dole out that $1k each year.  So, we can probably agree that subscribing to ALL of them is not necessary.

So, how many and which ones should you cough up the dough for?

Fold3

Not to sound all wishy-washy, but it depends on YOU and what kind of family research you are doing.  Some of us are perfectly content in sticking with the multitude of free websites available, but others (such as myself) do realize that the information we glean from the pay sites is WELL worth the cost of admission.

Let’s take me, for example.  To me, subscribing to Ancestry.com is a no-brainer.  And I’m just talking the U.S. Discovery package here.  I was a World Explorer once, but with going pro (again), I really only needed the States stuff – which is sufficient.  The breadth and scope of Ancestry’s domestic offerings are just what the doctor ordered for researching successfully for myself as well as others.

When it comes to military records, Fold3 is tops in my book.  They’ve got everything from enlistment records to actual pension FILES; and everything in between!  And now, under the Ancestry umbrella, military searches on there may bring up results linking directly to Fold3.  Pretty slick, I say!

NEHGS

As my research specialty is New England, NEHGS’s American Ancestors was another must-have.  They’ve got the Barbour Collection (CT vitals), The Great Migration Begins 1620-1633 (earliest immigrants) and their NEHGS Register, with Volume One dating all the way back to 1847.  Yes, there was genealogy back then.  The major selling point for me, though, was the ability to access Deaths Reported in the Boston Recorder and Telegraph, 1827 & 1828!  <–Joke.  And a bad one at that.

Is that it?  Of course not!  Just today, I decided to sign up for WorldVitalRecords and GenealogyBank.  Both offer trial periods (free and not), and I’ve had them on my to-check-out list for a few months now.

WVR

GenBank

Why these two?  Well, WVR because of their world vital records (duh) and Everton’s Genealogical Helper, an old favorite that I just enjoy flipping through.  For you young folk, it was THE genealogy magazine, before this whole crazy interweb thing.  Yes, a magazine.  Kind of like a book, but more flexible and chrono-relevant. 

GenealogyBank has newspapers, newspapers and MORE newspapers.  But again, this was after finding that it had the best selection of New England newspapers, compared to all the other guys.  Newspaper.com, NewspaperArchive.com and MORE newspaper-prefixed dot-coms.  GB also appears to have top-of-the-line OCR (Occasionally Correct Reader) software.  I was very impressed on a few of the items found, given the original papers’ condition and film quality.

Whenever I’m checking out any potential pay site, the very first thing I do is enter my name in the “free search” box.  No first name; only the last.  It’s uncommon enough so that I can tell what they have by what results come up for it.  You may want to try one of your obscure family names to get the same idea.

Speaking of free searches, I use Mocavo only for the search results and then find the links on my own.  As it’s a Google for genealogy, most things can be found easily enough once you know what they are.  If that makes any sense.  Sorry, Michael.

Bottom line: try before you buy.  LOOK at what records they actually HAVE, which I know can be difficult to do with some of them at times.  Do a few of those oddball searches, and if you go “Oooooooooooooooooooooo!” upon seeing the results; you’ve got your answer (heh).

And going back to the aforementioned Genealogical Helper, here’s a page from 25 years ago!

GenHelper

Pretty scary, eh?

 

And if YOU’RE looking “for a CHEAP estimate”, contact ME… The Online Genealogist!!!  Replace “Brockton, MA” with “West Lebanon, NH” and “Southeastern Massachusetts” with “New England, New York and Eastern Townships (early Quebec)”, and we’re there!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

The Online Genealogist sez “Great Scot!…but still UK”

110 PercentRegardless of CNN’s bad math (heh), it appears that Scotland will remain as part of the United Kingdom.  Why do I care?  Because I’m roughly 3/16th of Scottish descent!

My great-great-grandfather, James Morison, emigrated from Glasgow around 1886-1887.  He and his family spent most of their American life in South Boston, MA – at ten different addresses.  Which was NOT unusual for immigrants in the late 1800s/early 1900s.

Being The Online Genealogist, I thought I’d share some of the best links for Scottish research.

I’ve definitely had the best results using Scotlands People.

ScotPeeps

Even though it’s a credit-based service, if you can pinpoint where your ancestor lived via other methods, it’s well worth the cost.

Besides the usual FamilySearch.com, Ancestry.com, Cyndi’s List (etc.), here are some other links I’m SURE you will find helpful!

NatScot

ScotLib

ScotLib2

GenReg

Origins

ScotArch

SGS

GenUKi

IGS

ScotLinksThese are ALL great starting points for your online Scottish genealogy digging.

Here are a few websites specifically for Glaswegian research.

GlasgowHist

HistGlasgow

GlasgowDirs

GCCSpringburn is the village of Glasgow where James Morison lived prior to coming to America.

SpringAnd yes, it’s always fun to brag that my great-great-grandfather IS “Jim” Morison – heheheheh.

Jim2

Do you need help to Break On Through (To The Other Side) with regard to your family history research? Assisting with tearing down your genealogy brick walls would surely Light My Fire!  OK, this is The End of bad Doors references.

Anyway, you could always hire ME!…The Online Genealogist!!!!  And NOT feel like Riders On The Storm.  Sorry, it slipped out.

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

A few recent genealogy items worthy of note

FaGraveFind A Grave (via Ancestry.com’s blog) announced that the 100,000,000th photo was uploaded onto their website.  Yeah, I could’ve written it as “100 Million”, but look at all those ZEROES!

That’s a great milestone and pretty impressive for a website that many originally blew off as a celebrity-worship “ooooo, this is where he’s buried!” novelty destination that would be gone in a few years.  But after 19?  Boy, did they prove ME – errr, THEM wrong!!  Find A Grave is a definite boon for genealogists, historians and the entire goth community!  Me eating crow.  Poorly.

And has THIS finally been successfully proven?

Mail OnlineMr. Edwards claims he was able to extract DNA from a shawl found by one of Jack’s victims. How??  Ya gotta buy his BOOK to find out!!

JackEh, in all fairness, the article is rather meaty and has several photos, so I will not mock.  Thank you, Mr. Edwards!  The free plug for his BOOK should make up for any ill will.  Fascinating stuff, for sure!

And NOT to sound like a broken record regarding online records, but here’s MORE!!

FamilySearchScroll down a bit for the numbers.  FamilySearch.com is surely living up to their promise of a continuous flow of digitized records – indexed and non-indexed!  So, instead of waiting for the entire indexing process to catch up to the records (a few years??), they keep adding all sorts of goodies for us to BROWSE through.  Did I ever mention I love to browse? 

Well, even with all the indexes, I often end up browsing anyway.  Whether it be to find the actual ancestor I’m looking for or learn more of what and who’s around that ancestor if some promising results came up in the initial search.

These two FamilySearch items are of special note to U.S. researchers, as they are NEW sources; the others were updates to existing collections.

FS New 01FS New 02I’ll close out with something I came across today, from nearly 100 years ago, it’s the 1915 Norwich, Connecticut Tax List via the Norwich Bulletin!

NorwichThis is a great mid-decade resource for placing your Norwich, CT ancestor.  Check it out.  You could actually find someone you “know” in there!

But if your ancestors never lived in Norwich (99.9999% of us), I can still help you out!  Hire ME — The Online Genealogist!!!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

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