The Online Genealogist

John Brugliera

Archive for the month “September, 2014”

Darling Ross, and other curious names found in our genealogy research

Darling Ross

How would you like to be a guy and have to go through life with “Darling” as your first name?  “Hey, how ’bout hitchin’ up that team of horses?…Dar-ling!”  And did Mrs. Ross call him “Darling” or “Dahhhhhhrling”??

As family history researchers, we see unusual names like this quite frequently, giving us a chuckle as we quickly scan by, looking for the non-Darling Ross names in the search for our elusive ancestors.  The difference with me?  I save them… for posting here later on!

So, how did Mr. Ross end up with Darling as his first name?  Longtime genealogists will surmise that it’s not based on his sparkling personality; more likely a mother’s or grandmother’s maiden name.  Colonial surnames were sometimes used as first names for later children.  If I were researching our darling Darling here, I would surely be looking at possible Darling families living nearby.

But enough with the helpful hints – on with the silliness!

Appropriate names are always fun.  What ELSE would you expect this fellow to do for work?

Federal Census 1850 Carpenter 2

From the 1923 Bristol, CT Directory, a confused worker…

Bristol CT Directory 1923 61aIs he an employee or is he the BOSS?

Do you think this Norwich, CT family has a problem trying to sit still?

Norwich Bulletin 19150121 09a

And of course, staying in Norwich, we can’t forget marriages.

Isn’t this one of those Pacific Islands in the middle of nowhere?

Norwich Bulletin 19150218 07a

Is this a couple or a birdwatching guide?

Norwich Bulletin 19140928 07a

This second couple went WAY out of their way to offset “what people may think”.

Norwich Bulletin 19140930 07a

…and this couple, uhhhhh – didn’t!

Norwich Bulletin 19141014 07a

Happiness and Gaiety, not far behind!

Norwich Bulletin 19141104 11a

But in the 1919 Brockton, MA Directory, someone is not quite sure.

Brockton Directory 1919 86 DionAnd ending off with a couple in Buxton, ME… marriage expectation a bit too high?

Living & Loving 2Was the Dunnel of Love, but now Mrs. Love Lane.  Living and Love in church records – yes!

 

Amongst our Living, I’d Love to research family histories for you!

 

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

Advertisements

How many genealogy pay sites does one really need to subscribe to?

Ancestry

I wonder if any fellow researcher has determined how much it would cost per year to subscribe to ALL of the major annual-payment genealogy websites.  What do you think that dollar amount would tally up to?

Just off the top of my head, I’d say $1,000 would be a good ballpark figure.  Of course, only the (wealthy!) genealogist who needs access to EVERYTHING would ever dole out that $1k each year.  So, we can probably agree that subscribing to ALL of them is not necessary.

So, how many and which ones should you cough up the dough for?

Fold3

Not to sound all wishy-washy, but it depends on YOU and what kind of family research you are doing.  Some of us are perfectly content in sticking with the multitude of free websites available, but others (such as myself) do realize that the information we glean from the pay sites is WELL worth the cost of admission.

Let’s take me, for example.  To me, subscribing to Ancestry.com is a no-brainer.  And I’m just talking the U.S. Discovery package here.  I was a World Explorer once, but with going pro (again), I really only needed the States stuff – which is sufficient.  The breadth and scope of Ancestry’s domestic offerings are just what the doctor ordered for researching successfully for myself as well as others.

When it comes to military records, Fold3 is tops in my book.  They’ve got everything from enlistment records to actual pension FILES; and everything in between!  And now, under the Ancestry umbrella, military searches on there may bring up results linking directly to Fold3.  Pretty slick, I say!

NEHGS

As my research specialty is New England, NEHGS’s American Ancestors was another must-have.  They’ve got the Barbour Collection (CT vitals), The Great Migration Begins 1620-1633 (earliest immigrants) and their NEHGS Register, with Volume One dating all the way back to 1847.  Yes, there was genealogy back then.  The major selling point for me, though, was the ability to access Deaths Reported in the Boston Recorder and Telegraph, 1827 & 1828!  <–Joke.  And a bad one at that.

Is that it?  Of course not!  Just today, I decided to sign up for WorldVitalRecords and GenealogyBank.  Both offer trial periods (free and not), and I’ve had them on my to-check-out list for a few months now.

WVR

GenBank

Why these two?  Well, WVR because of their world vital records (duh) and Everton’s Genealogical Helper, an old favorite that I just enjoy flipping through.  For you young folk, it was THE genealogy magazine, before this whole crazy interweb thing.  Yes, a magazine.  Kind of like a book, but more flexible and chrono-relevant. 

GenealogyBank has newspapers, newspapers and MORE newspapers.  But again, this was after finding that it had the best selection of New England newspapers, compared to all the other guys.  Newspaper.com, NewspaperArchive.com and MORE newspaper-prefixed dot-coms.  GB also appears to have top-of-the-line OCR (Occasionally Correct Reader) software.  I was very impressed on a few of the items found, given the original papers’ condition and film quality.

Whenever I’m checking out any potential pay site, the very first thing I do is enter my name in the “free search” box.  No first name; only the last.  It’s uncommon enough so that I can tell what they have by what results come up for it.  You may want to try one of your obscure family names to get the same idea.

Speaking of free searches, I use Mocavo only for the search results and then find the links on my own.  As it’s a Google for genealogy, most things can be found easily enough once you know what they are.  If that makes any sense.  Sorry, Michael.

Bottom line: try before you buy.  LOOK at what records they actually HAVE, which I know can be difficult to do with some of them at times.  Do a few of those oddball searches, and if you go “Oooooooooooooooooooooo!” upon seeing the results; you’ve got your answer (heh).

And going back to the aforementioned Genealogical Helper, here’s a page from 25 years ago!

GenHelper

Pretty scary, eh?

 

And if YOU’RE looking “for a CHEAP estimate”, contact ME… The Online Genealogist!!!  Replace “Brockton, MA” with “West Lebanon, NH” and “Southeastern Massachusetts” with “New England, New York and Eastern Townships (early Quebec)”, and we’re there!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

The Online Genealogist sez “Great Scot!…but still UK”

110 PercentRegardless of CNN’s bad math (heh), it appears that Scotland will remain as part of the United Kingdom.  Why do I care?  Because I’m roughly 3/16th of Scottish descent!

My great-great-grandfather, James Morison, emigrated from Glasgow around 1886-1887.  He and his family spent most of their American life in South Boston, MA – at ten different addresses.  Which was NOT unusual for immigrants in the late 1800s/early 1900s.

Being The Online Genealogist, I thought I’d share some of the best links for Scottish research.

I’ve definitely had the best results using Scotlands People.

ScotPeeps

Even though it’s a credit-based service, if you can pinpoint where your ancestor lived via other methods, it’s well worth the cost.

Besides the usual FamilySearch.com, Ancestry.com, Cyndi’s List (etc.), here are some other links I’m SURE you will find helpful!

NatScot

ScotLib

ScotLib2

GenReg

Origins

ScotArch

SGS

GenUKi

IGS

ScotLinksThese are ALL great starting points for your online Scottish genealogy digging.

Here are a few websites specifically for Glaswegian research.

GlasgowHist

HistGlasgow

GlasgowDirs

GCCSpringburn is the village of Glasgow where James Morison lived prior to coming to America.

SpringAnd yes, it’s always fun to brag that my great-great-grandfather IS “Jim” Morison – heheheheh.

Jim2

Do you need help to Break On Through (To The Other Side) with regard to your family history research? Assisting with tearing down your genealogy brick walls would surely Light My Fire!  OK, this is The End of bad Doors references.

Anyway, you could always hire ME!…The Online Genealogist!!!!  And NOT feel like Riders On The Storm.  Sorry, it slipped out.

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

A few recent genealogy items worthy of note

FaGraveFind A Grave (via Ancestry.com’s blog) announced that the 100,000,000th photo was uploaded onto their website.  Yeah, I could’ve written it as “100 Million”, but look at all those ZEROES!

That’s a great milestone and pretty impressive for a website that many originally blew off as a celebrity-worship “ooooo, this is where he’s buried!” novelty destination that would be gone in a few years.  But after 19?  Boy, did they prove ME – errr, THEM wrong!!  Find A Grave is a definite boon for genealogists, historians and the entire goth community!  Me eating crow.  Poorly.

And has THIS finally been successfully proven?

Mail OnlineMr. Edwards claims he was able to extract DNA from a shawl found by one of Jack’s victims. How??  Ya gotta buy his BOOK to find out!!

JackEh, in all fairness, the article is rather meaty and has several photos, so I will not mock.  Thank you, Mr. Edwards!  The free plug for his BOOK should make up for any ill will.  Fascinating stuff, for sure!

And NOT to sound like a broken record regarding online records, but here’s MORE!!

FamilySearchScroll down a bit for the numbers.  FamilySearch.com is surely living up to their promise of a continuous flow of digitized records – indexed and non-indexed!  So, instead of waiting for the entire indexing process to catch up to the records (a few years??), they keep adding all sorts of goodies for us to BROWSE through.  Did I ever mention I love to browse? 

Well, even with all the indexes, I often end up browsing anyway.  Whether it be to find the actual ancestor I’m looking for or learn more of what and who’s around that ancestor if some promising results came up in the initial search.

These two FamilySearch items are of special note to U.S. researchers, as they are NEW sources; the others were updates to existing collections.

FS New 01FS New 02I’ll close out with something I came across today, from nearly 100 years ago, it’s the 1915 Norwich, Connecticut Tax List via the Norwich Bulletin!

NorwichThis is a great mid-decade resource for placing your Norwich, CT ancestor.  Check it out.  You could actually find someone you “know” in there!

But if your ancestors never lived in Norwich (99.9999% of us), I can still help you out!  Hire ME — The Online Genealogist!!!

TOG WEB

johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

The Online Genealogist asks “Why is CITING so often unexCITING?”

Citation Tools

As genealogists, we know that we need to cite each and every record used in our family history research.  That much I’m sure we all agree on.  But HOW we do that is where much disagreement arises.  The topic could fill a book.

In fact, it already has; several of them at that.  These are the two biggies when it comes to genealogy.

Evidence           Cite

I must admit, I’ve always had trouble with citations and footnotes in general; how to format them, where to put them.  Which comes first – the author or the date?  Should the footnotes be on the same page or at the end of a chapter?  Do we really need to be so particular as to how they’re constructed?  Apparently so!

It used to be acceptable to include enough information so that if someone else were to come across our research, they could easily determine where a particular record originated from.  But apparently, that’s not good enough anymore.  Now it seems they need to be constructed perfectly, with all items in a particular order as if our research report was some major term paper to be graded by a panel of red marker-holding genealogy professors.

apa-1-intext

The date should NOT be written in Roman Numerals as it appears in that old book!  City of publication, publisher and date HAVE to be in that order, WITHIN parenthesis!  You’ve got a COMMA where a SEMI-COLON should be and a SEMI-COLON where a COMMA should be!  It’s enough to drive a genealogist MAD!  Or at least write a blog post about it.

And the RULES vary for each type of record!  Whether it be a family bible filled with names and dates, Burlington Free Press newspaper obituary, Civil War pension application, 1910 census record or Italian marriage allegati, the RULES are different for each type.  One size does NOT fit all.

The consensus seems to be – there IS no consensus!  How CAN there be with so many different types of records that we’re attempting to document?  And these RULES are for U.S.-based genealogists only.  “Our” RULES do not apply to England or France, where they have their own set of RULES for citing reference materials.  Are you somehow getting a sense that I have issue with many of these RULES??

comic28Anyway, enough ranting on the subject; how about a solution to a problem that many of us seem to have when attempting to link a citation to an electronic record, which we’re obviously seeing more and more of these days.  What good is ANY citation “correct” or otherwise if it’s not with the record it pertains to?  You might as well not cite that source at all if you’re keeping the records in one place and the actual citations in another.

But with most electronic files, there IS a way to have the two always connected.  As most of you know, sites such as ancestry.com and familysearch.com have come a long way to help ease our pain with all things needing to be cited.  Most times, when you bring up a record on either site, the citation is RIGHT THERE, available to cut and paste.

So, where have I been successfully storing these handy-dandy citations?  In the electronic file’s COMMENTS area!  Here’s how…

Pick a record – ANY record!  For this example, I randomly chose a New Hampshire marriage record on familysearch.com.

Citation 01

First step, of course, is to download the record.  Then, as noted at the bottom left, is the little “Show Citation” box.  Click on that and up pops the citation for this record.

Citation 02

Hitting that “Copy Citation” will send it to your computer’s clipboard.

Next, go to your downloaded file and right-click on that, then hit “Properties” at the bottom, where you’ll get…

Citation 03

Hit the “Details” tab, then go down to “Comments”.  Place your cursor anywhere to the right and an “Add comments” box appears.  Click anywhere within and you’re now ready to paste the citation you copied.  Like so…

Citation 04

Hit the “OK” button and the citation will forever remain within this .jpg file!  Pretty slick, huh?

And don’t worry about not being able to fit it all in that small-looking box.   You’d be amazed at how much you can get in there!  I have yet to fill it up and for music mp3s, as I sometimes put the song’s lyrics in there no problemo!   So, you can add anything you’d like in there without any Twitter-like character restrictions.

For ancestry.com, the process is similar; they just have a different way of copying the citation to the computer’s clipboard.  The rest is exactly the same.

Two file types I have NOT seen a Comments box in the Details tab is .png (mainly via the Windows 7 snipping tool) and .pdf.  The only way I know of getting around this is to copy the file to a .jpg format in PhotoShop, etc.

The main negative in using this method is that you’d have to (somehow) let it be KNOWN that you’re saving the citations in this manner, as it’s not very intuitive.  But if we all start cutting and pasting the citations and adding them to the comments in this manner, it would be a non-issue!

With this, you’ll never have to look for an electronic record’s citation elsewhere ever again!

Come to find out, though, most of the citations on these two websites are “unacceptable”, according to the two books above.  But I’m not going to worry about that now, because I at least have SOMETHING useable attached to each record!

 

And if you don’t want to deal with citations or footnotes, hire ME, the Online Genealogist!!

TOG WEB
johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

Nothin’ like a few million FREE IMAGES to spice up your family story!

Flickr - IA

The Internet Archive folks recently posted over 2.5 million IMAGES onto the photo-sharing website, Flickr.  Extracted from thousands of books originally searchable by text ONLY at Internet Archive.  Now the images can be searched on Flickr!

Why is this a big deal for genealogists?  We get perty pictures to go with our family histories!  Even though they are mostly “old” images past copyright, you’ll  surely discover a visual gem or two to accompany your ancestors’ stories.

Whether it be something specific like a photo of a long-gone family homestead or generic such as a period steam liner used to illustrate an immigrant family’s trans-Atlantic journey – it’s probably in there.  Remember, we’re talking over two-and-a-half million images here!

So, if you had MacLarens in Windsor, Ontario around 1900, they may have been “manufacturing” cheese…

MacLaren

Or perhaps some of your family lived near Chicago’s Garfield Park.  Here’s a close-up of that area from 1921.  There are several other neighborhoods available for viewing/downloading!

Garfield

Maybe you’re the 3rd-great-grandchild of Dr. P. Edward Seguin, who set up practice in Royalton, Minnesota.  Do a Flickr search for him now and his photo comes right up!  He’s the one with the facial hair (heh).

Seguin 01

Then you hit a link and the original book is shown in its entirety; you’ll see the image in context and maybe find a few more words to go with your Man of 10,000 Lakes.

Seguin 02

Nice stash there, guy.  Oh, and check out his goateed colleague, George Allen Love, M.D. — Dr. Love!  (And yes, I love stuff “finding me” like this.)  Time to break out some Kiss!…

And while most early records aren’t OCR-friendly, they are definitely considered to be images.  Such as the below Allen County, Indiana Circuit Court Index from 1824.  (Hi ACPL!)  All images are downloadable, with Flickr’s excellent choices ranging from thumbnail to original.  I always grab the original, then re-size that as needed.

Allen 02

You can also download several stock photo-type items without the worry of being busted by the copyright police!  Like this large uppercase “C” for your the background of your Carlson Family homepage.

C

Anyway, you get the idea.  That is to NOT overlook this incredible Flickr/Internet Archive e-collection while gathering all sorts of images for your family story.

Then there’s this one image we will ALL use when we finish our family histories and they’re complete.

Adam & Eve

HA – GOTCHA!!!

Oh, and PhotoShop, etc. can also straighten images to make them even PERTIER!

 

And if YOU think that your ancestry can be traced all the way back to Adam & Eve, do NOT hire me — the Online Genealogist!!

TOG WEB

 

 johnbrugliera@theonlinegenealogist.com

 

Post Navigation